Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Associate Professor of Sociology, Rajshahi University, Bangladesh

2 Assistant Professor of Sociology, Rajshahi University, Bangladesh

Abstract

Bangladesh has made tremendous achievements in different health indicators, including maternal health (MH), over the last few decades. An increase in the availability of and accessibility to maternal health care (MHC) services is one of the prime reasons for the current improvement of MH. The study therefore took an attempt to explore the issue of MHC services, provided by different organizations in Rajshahi city, with the specific objective of finding out how far poor women had the availability of and accessibility to MHC services. The research used both primary and secondary sources of data. A triangulation of method (interviews of service recipients and providers and field observation) was used for collecting primary data. The data was collected during March and April, 2013, from two slum areas in Rajshahi city. Total number of sample is 200. Almost all respondents have the nearest healthcare centres providing good quality MHC services within their reach. The findings of the study suggest that there has been an increase in the availability of and accessibility to MHC services in the study areas which ultimately helps further improvement of MH.

Keywords

Ahmed, S., & Khan, M. (2011). A maternal health voucher scheme: What have we learned from the demand-side financing scheme in Bangladesh. Health Policy and Planning, 26, 25-32.           

Alkire, S., & Santos, M. E. (2010). Multidimesional Poverty Index. OPHI Research Brief.

Anderson, P. (2012). After Nehru. London Review of Books, 34, 21-36.

BIDS. (2003). Micro Impacts of Macroeconomic and Adjustment Policies in Bangladesh (MIMAP) Technical Paper no 8  Retrieved 5th November, 2009, from www.mdgbangla.org/mdg_issues/.../poverty_data_bids.htm

Blum, L., Sharmin, T., & Ronsmans, C. (2006). Attending home vs. clinic-based deliveries: perspectives of skilled birth attendants in Matlab, Bangladesh. Reproductive Health Matters, 14(27), 51-60.

Cham, M., Sundby, J., & Vangen, S. (2009). Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care in Gambia's main referral hospital: women-users' testimonies. Reproductive Health, 6(1), 5.

CIA World Factbook (2013). Bangladesh. Retrieved 12th July, 2013 from www.indexmundi.com/bangladesh

D'Ambruoso, L., Abbey, M., & Hussein, J. (2005). Please understand when I cry out in pain: women's accounts of maternity services during labour and delivery in Ghana. BMC Public Health, 5(1), 140.            

Fotso, J., Ezeh, A., Madise, N., Ziraba, A., & Ogollah, R. (2009). What does access to maternal care mean among the urban poor? Factors associated with use of appropriate maternal health services in the slum settlements of Nairobi, Kenya. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 13(1), 130-137.

Germov, J. (2002). Imagining Health problems as Social Issues. In J. Germov (Ed.), Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology (2nd ed., pp. 3-27). Victoria: Oxford University Press.

Hulton, L., Matthews, Z., & Stones, R. (2007). Applying a framework for assessing the quality of maternal health services in urban India. Social Science & Medicine, 64(10), 2083-2095.

Khan, S. (2005). Free does not mean affordable: maternity patient expenditures in a public hospital in Bangladesh. Cost Effectiveness and Resource Allocation, 3(1), 1.

Killingsworth, J. R., Hossain, N., Hedrick-Wong, Y., Thomas, S. D., Rahman, A., & Begum, T. (1999). Unofficial fees in Bangladesh: price, equity and institutional issues. Health Policy and Planning, 14(2), 152-163.        

Marshall, A. A., & McKeon, J. K. (1996). Reaching the "Unreachables": Educating and Motivating Women Living in Poverty. In E. B. Ray (Ed.), Communication and Disenfranchisement: Social Health Issues and Implications (pp. 137-158). New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

Nath, D. k. (2008). Health policy for achieving MDGs, Point Counterpoint, The Daily Star, April 21.

NIPORT. (2001). Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 1999-2000  Retrieved 5th November, 2009, from http://www.mdgbangla.org/mdg_issues/improve_maternal_hlt/improve_maternal_hlt_data.htm

NIPORT, Associates, M. A., & International, M. (2009). Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2007. Dhaka, Bangladesh and Calverton, Maryland, USA: National Institute of Population Research and Training (NIPORT), Mitra and Associates, and Macro International.

NIPORT, Associates, M. A., & International, M. (2005). Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2004. Dhaka, Bangladesh and Calverton, Maryland, USA: National Institute of Population Research and Training (NIPORT), Mitra and Associates, and Macro International.

NIPORT, Associates, M. A., & International, M. (2012). Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey, 2011: Preliminay Report. Dhaka, Bangladesh and Calverton, Maryland, USA: National Institute of Population Research and Training (NIPORT), Mitra and Associates, and Macro International.

PDUN. (2007). ESCAP Population Data Sheet 2007. Bangkok: Population Division of United Nations (PDUN).

UNDP. (2003). Human Development Report 2003. New York: United Nations Development Program (UNDP).

Wagle, R., Sabroe, S., & Nielsen, B. (2004). Socioeconomic and physical distance to the maternity hospital as predictors for place of delivery: An observational study from Nepal. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 4.